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Author Archives: Nostalgoa

Regular Conjugations — Conjugation 3

Transitive verbs ending in eunk A brief review I think it is best to begin with a short review of what we have done so far with regard to the conjugations of Konkani verbs. As mentioned earlier, the best way to learn any Konkani verb is to learn and, if possible, memorize all its five … Continue reading »

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Mum & Ki na?

Interrogative Endings In daily parlance, when we talk to people, we invariably ask and answer questions pertaining to daily life. Sometimes we add different nuances to questions by the intonation we put into them. Such is undoubtedly the case with Konkani as well. But in Konkani, as in many other languages, we can add certain … Continue reading »

Categories: Idioms & Phrases | Leave a comment

Misak vechem dhanvon; zhuzak vechem ravon

If you’re going for Mass, go to Church post-haste; if you are going to war, you’ve got ample time to waste The literal translation of Misak vechem dhanvon; zhuzak vechem ravon is: “When going for Mass, one should hurry; when going to war, one should be tardy”. This proverb isn’t to be taken literally or … Continue reading »

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Regular Declensions — Declension 4

The Fourth Declension Just as the first and second declensions follow a similar pattern, the third and the fourth too resemble each other in a parallel manner. And while the first and third declensions comprise only masculine and neuter nouns, the second and fourth declensions cover only feminine nouns. The fourth declension comprises only feminine … Continue reading »

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Konkani Spellmanship

Spelling out the rules of Konkani spellings Unlike most Indian languages, Konkani is not tied to any single script but is written in at least three Indian scripts as well as the Roman script which we have adopted in nostalgoa.com. But while many languages written in the Roman script may not be phonetic languages, Konkani … Continue reading »

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Regular Declensions — Declension 3

The Third Declension The third declension comprises the following nouns (but no adjectives): monosyllabic (single syllable) masculine nouns ending in i, disyllabic (having two syllables) masculine nouns ending in i, which have a single consonant sound between the two syllables, e.g., dhobi, ghaddi. monosyllabic neuter nouns ending in im, e.g., bim disyllabic neuter nouns ending … Continue reading »

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Sangnnechi sangnni, ponnsak zalim vaingim

Tale of a tale, a minnow swallowed a whale The literal translation of Sangnnechi sangnni, ponnsak zalim vaingim is: Tale of a tale, a jack fruit tree bore aubergines (or aubergines grew on a jackfruit tree). That is to say, a series of tales can end up with the fantastic report (and presumably a belief … Continue reading »

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Khakêk asa cheddo, sôdta sogllo vaddo

In her arm is her child for whom she scours the wild A number of proverbs portray certain interesting and unexpected, yet not too rare, natural phenomena. Khakêk asa cheddo, sôdta sogllo vaddo is one such. Khak (fem.) is an armpit — khakêk being its dative form — and vaddo (masc.) is a section of a … Continue reading »

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Disachea disa

Day after day Disachea disa, ratichê rati, sumanachea sumana or satolleachea satollea, mhoineachea mhoinea, and vorsachea vorsaare similarly constructed phrases respectively meaning day after day, night after night, week after week, month after month and year after year. To examine the peculiar type of construction, let’s just take the first phrase: day after day. The word … Continue reading »

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Dekhlem moddem, aylem roddnnem

Right before me the dead body lies, A flood of tears welling in my eyes Dekhlem moddem, aylem roddnnem literally means “Saw the dead body, couldn’t help crying”. Note that the sentence has no subject, that is, it almost doesn’t matter who that person might be, suggesting that the phenomenon is a part of human … Continue reading »

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